Friday, October 15, 2010


The dates too close for comfort as Operation Ore was about to EXPLODE...along came the McCanns and Gamble was in the driving seat.

An article in the Guardian, and a more detailed story in PC Pro, give the background to Operation Ore. In this operation, hundreds (and possibly thousands) of innocent men were raided by the police on suspicion of downloading child pornography, when in fact they had simply been victims of credit card fraud. The police appear to have completely misunderstood the forensic evidence; once the light began to dawn, it seems that they closed ranks and covered up. These stories follow an earlier piece in PC Pro which first brought the problem to public attention in 2005.
Recently we were asked by the Lords Science and Technology Committee whether failures of online security caused real problems, or were exaggerated. While there is no doubt that many people talk up the threats, here is a real case in which online fraud has done much worse harm than simply emptying bank accounts. Having the police turn up at six in the morning, search your house, tell your wife that you’re a suspected pedophile, and with social workers in tow to interview your children, must be a horrific experience. Over thirty men have killed themselves. At least one appears to have been innocent. As this story develops, I believe it will come to be seen as the worst policing scandal in the UK for many years.
I remarked recently that it was a bad idea for the police to depend on the banks for expertise on card fraud, and to accept their money to fund such investigations as the banks wanted carried out. Although Home Office and DTI ministers say they’re happy with these arrangements, the tragic events of Operation Ore show that the police should not compromise their independence and their technical capability for short-term political or financial convenience. The results can simply be tragic.